Skin Allergy Types: A Guide for Prevention and Treatment

There are many skin allergy types and causes. Find out the different kinds to more effectively treat and prevent these common skin conditions.

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Itching. Redness. Bumps. Swelling. Flaking. Skin allergies can cause major discomfort, affect your daily routine, and make you feel self-conscious about your appearance. If you are a skin allergy sufferer, remember — you are not alone! The good news is that most symptoms are easily treatable. Look and feel your best, and keep your daily schedule intact, by learning more about different skin allergy types.

Skin Allergy Types

Skin allergies occur when the immune system reacts to a harmless substance, typically causing rashes and often causing itching [link to article A1 The Most Common Causes of Allergies]. Some of the most common skin allergy types include:

Allergic Contact Dermatitis

Allergic Contact Dermatitis

This irritation is a reaction to something touching your skin. Plants, such as poison ivy, are common examples as well as nickel, a metal common in jewelry. These allergy rashes feature raised blisters and bumps, and they can be very painful and itchy.

Hives

Hives

Hives are bumps or welts that form from allergic reactions. They can last for up to six weeks.

Triggers for Skin Allergies

Many things can cause skin allergies, including textiles, food, plants, jewelry and environmental factors. You can minimize your chances of having allergy rashes or a skin allergy reaction by watching out for these things.

Plants with Three Leaves or More

Plants with Three Leaves or More

Contact dermatitis is often caused by plants with three leaves or more. If you come in contact with poison ivy, a thorough hand wash with soap and water right after exposure may remove the sticky substance (urushiol) that triggers the allergy rashes.

Temperature

Temperature

Everybody is different — especially when it comes to skin allergy triggers. For some people, hot weather can be a trigger. For others, cold, dry weather can trigger allergy rashes. Colder weather can dry out skin and leave people vulnerable to a reaction.

Sun Exposure

Sun Exposure

Besides heat, sunlight can also be an allergy trigger. Sunscreens may protect you from UV rays, but be careful because certain chemicals in sunscreen can be allergy triggers too.

Pollen, Pet Dander and Dust Mites

Pollen, Pet Dander and Dust Mites

Pollen, pet dander [link to article A5: Managing Pet Allergies] and dust mites [link to article A4: The Dirt on Dust Mites] can do more than make your nose run and your eyes itch. They can also cause a skin allergy. If these allergens are triggers for you, keep pets out of your bedroom, keep your house clean, and close your windows. These are only a few things you can do to avoid allergens and prevent different skin allergy types from occurring.

Water

Water

Salt in seawater and chlorine in swimming pools can irritate people and trigger allergy rashes. Additionally, aquagenic urticaria is a rare form of hives that causes a rash to appear after touching water.

Other Irritants

Common household products may contain ingredients that can irritate the skin, such as fragrances, dyes, and other chemicals in cleaning agents or cosmetics. Some materials, such as metals, latex or other textiles may also cause various skin allergy types.

Treatment for Various Skin Allergy Types

There are several ways to treat skin allergies [link to article A3: Daily and Weekly Allergy Tips]! You should avoid scratching at all costs because that can cause further irritation.

Over-the-counter

Over-the-counter antihistamines can prove helpful at alleviating skin allergy symptoms. Loratadine (Claritin®) is not only indicated for the relief of allergic rhinitis symptoms, but also skin allergy symptoms including urticaria and other dermatological disorders.

 

If symptoms persist, consult your doctor. Individual responses may vary.

ASC Ref. No. B076N072721CS
L.PH.MKT.CC.05.2021.1008

 

REFERENCES

  • Allergy Facts and Figures. Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. Accessed March 17, 2020.
  • Allergies and Hay Fever . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Accessed March 17, 2020.
  • What Is an Allergic Skin Condition? Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America. Accessed March 17, 2020.
  • What is a Skin Allergy? Intermountain Healthcare. Accessed March 17, 2020.
  • Poison Ivy, Sumac and Oak. American Skin Association. Accessed March 17, 2020.